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Mosquito-disseminated pyriproxyfen yields high breeding-site coverage and boosts juvenile mosquito mortality at the neighborhood scale

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Mosquito-disseminated pyriproxyfen yields high breeding-site coverage and boosts juvenile mosquito mortality at the neighborhood scale

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Título Mosquito-disseminated pyriproxyfen yields high breeding-site coverage and boosts juvenile mosquito mortality at the neighborhood scale
Autor Franch, Fernando Abad
Perea, Elvira Zamora
Oliveira, Gonçalo Nuno Côrte-Real Ferraz de
Torres, Samael D. Padilla
Luz, Sergio L. B.
Abstract Mosquito-borne pathogens pose major public health challenges worldwide. With vaccines or effective drugs still unavailable for most such pathogens, disease prevention heavily relies on vector control. To date, however, mosquito control has proven difficult, with low breeding-site coverage during control campaigns identified as a major drawback. A novel tactic exploits the egg-laying behavior of mosquitoes to have them disseminate tiny particles of a potent larvicide, pyriproxyfen (PPF), from resting to breeding sites, thus improving coverage. This approach has yielded promising results at small spatial scales, but its wider applicability remains unclear. We conducted a four-month trial within a 20-month study to investigate mosquito-driven dissemination of PPF dust-particles from 100 ‘dissemination stations’ (DSs) deployed in a 7-ha sub-area to surveillance dwellings and sentinel breeding sites (SBSs) distributed over an urban neighborhood of about 50 ha.We assessed the impact of the trial by measuring juvenile mosquito mortality and adult mosquito emergence in each SBS-month. Using data from 1,075 dwelling-months, 2,988 SBS-months, and 29,922 individualmosquitoes, we show that mosquito-disseminated PPF yielded high coverage of dwellings (up to 100%) and SBSs (up to 94.3%). Juvenile mosquito mortality in SBSs (about 4%at baseline) increased by over one order ofmagnitude during PPF dissemination (about 75%). This led to a >10-fold decrease of adult mosquito emergence from SBSs, from approximately 1,000–3,000 adults/month before to about 100 adults/month during PPF dissemination. By expanding breeding-site coverage and boosting juvenile mosquito mortality, a strategy based on mosquito-disseminated PPF has potential to substantially enhance mosquito control. Sharp declines in adult mosquito emergence can lower vector/host ratios, reducing the risk of disease outbreaks. This approach is a very promising complement to current and novel mosquito control strategies; it will probably be especially relevant for the control of urban disease vectors, such as Aedes and Culex species, that often cause large epidemics.
Resumo Mosquito-transmitted diseases are among the most challenging infectious threats worldwide. Mosquito control is crucial for preventing infection and disease, particularly when effective vaccines or drugs are unavailable. A major drawback of current mosquito control strategies is that mosquito breeding sites are often overlooked, and therefore left untreated, during control campaigns. One appealing alternative proposes exploiting the innate breeding- site–finding ability of female mosquitoes to have them disseminate tiny insecticide particles that poison their offspring. Thus far, however, this idea has only been tested in small-scale trials. Here we show that mosquitoes effectively transferred insecticide particles from dissemination stations to sentinel breeding sites over distances between 3 and 400 m in a tropical urban neighborhood. This yielded high breeding-site coverage, with up to 94.3% of sentinel breeding sites presenting evidence of contamination with mosquitodisseminated insecticide. We recorded a 10-fold increase of juvenile mosquito mortality and a 10-fold decrease of adult mosquito emergence during the four-month dissemination trial. In combination with other tactics, this approach has the potential to considerably enhance mosquito-borne disease prevention, particularly in urban settings.
Contido em Plos Neglected Tropical Diseases. San Francisco. Vol. 9, no. 4 (Apr. 2015), 1-17 p.
Assunto Aedes aegypti : Prevençao e controle
Pyriproxyfen
Origem Estrangeiro
Tipo Artigo de periódico
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10183/122599
Arquivos Descrição Formato
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