Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMorgan-Short, Karapt_BR
dc.contributor.authorFinger, Ingridpt_BR
dc.contributor.authorGrey, Sarahpt_BR
dc.contributor.authorUllman, Michaelpt_BR
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-25T02:05:26Zpt_BR
dc.date.issued2012pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203pt_BR
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10183/96859pt_BR
dc.description.abstractAlthough learning a second language (L2) as an adult is notoriously difficult, research has shown that adults can indeed attain native language-like brain processing and high proficiency levels. However, it is important to then retain what has been attained, even in the absence of continued exposure to the L2—particularly since periods of minimal or no L2 exposure are common. This event-related potential (ERP) study of an artificial language tested performance and neural processing following a substantial period of no exposure. Adults learned to speak and comprehend the artificial language to high proficiency with either explicit, classroom-like, or implicit, immersion-like training, and then underwent several months of no exposure to the language. Surprisingly, proficiency did not decrease during this delay. Instead, it remained unchanged, and there was an increase in native-like neural processing of syntax, as evidenced by several ERP changes— including earlier, more reliable, and more left-lateralized anterior negativities, and more robust P600s, in response to wordorder violations. Moreover, both the explicitly and implicitly trained groups showed increased native-like ERP patterns over the delay, indicating that such changes can hold independently of L2 training type. The results demonstrate that substantial periods with no L2 exposure are not necessarily detrimental. Rather, benefits may ensue from such periods of time even when there is no L2 exposure. Interestingly, both before and after the delay the implicitly trained group showed more native-like processing than the explicitly trained group, indicating that type of training also affects the attainment of nativelike processing in the brain. Overall, the findings may be largely explained by a combination of forgetting and consolidation in declarative and procedural memory, on which L2 grammar learning appears to depend. The study has a range of implications, and suggests a research program with potentially important consequences for second language acquisition and related fields.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfpt_BR
dc.language.isoengpt_BR
dc.relation.ispartofPLOS ONE. San Francisco, California, USA. Vol. 7, n. 3 (Mar. 2012), p. 1-18pt_BR
dc.rightsOpen Accessen
dc.subjectAquisição de segunda línguapt_BR
dc.subjectAdultopt_BR
dc.subjectCogniçãopt_BR
dc.titleSecond language processing shows increased native-like neural responses after months of no exposurept_BR
dc.typeArtigo de periódicopt_BR
dc.identifier.nrb000915939pt_BR
dc.type.originEstrangeiropt_BR


Files in this item

Thumbnail
   

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License

Show simple item record